Digital Workplace Predictions for 2017 – by Paul Miller

Writing on the Digital Workplace Group blog, Paul shares his ten predictions for digital workplaces in 2017. One in particular has been a focus of mine for the past decade:

2. Focus shifts from “firing up tech” to changing behaviour and culture

This is a striking change that we in the Digital Workplace Group have seen strongly in 2016. For the first time, many large enterprises are most concerned about culture and behaviour change when deploying new digital workplace services – and are viewing turning on the technology more as a “hygiene factor”, particularly as services move relentlessly to the cloud.


For one major pharma client in Germany, their new collaboration services were straightforward technically – but after evidence from their history that simply implementing new technologies doesn’t bring the much-touted benefits to employees, this time they turned to change management and culture as the levers they needed to tackle. This pattern will extend for many organizations and the so-called “soft skills” of digital workplace improvements will take centre stage.

I hope this thinking spreads far and wide …

Read more: My 10 digital workplace predictions for 2017

User Adoption Strategies (2nd Edition): Now Available as Digital Book

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My book on user adoption strategies is finally available as a digital book. You don’t have to wait for your copy to wing its way across the world any longer – just pay, download, and get stuck into reading. And then into applying the ideas / strategies / concepts in your work (which of course was the point in writing the book in the first place).

The digital book is US$19, compared to the previous price of US$49 for the printed book (with the majority of the difference the cost of postage).

Table of Contents
Foreword – by Nancy White (Full Circle Associates)
Chapter 1. Focusing on User Adoption is Critical
Chapter 2. The Context for User Adoption Strategies
Chapter 3. What We Know About Change
Chapter 4. New Ways of Working
Chapter 5. The Four Stages Model of User Adoption
Chapter 6. Winning Attention
Chapter 7. Cultivating Basic Concepts
Chapter 8. Enlivening Applicability
Chapter 9. Making It Real
Chapter 10. Crafting Your User Adoption Approach
Chapter 11. Measuring and Evaluating User Adoption
Chapter 12. User Adoption for Advocates of the Old Way
Chapter 13. Final Thoughts

Look Inside the Book
To check out the book, download the Look Inside extract. It is 38-pages in length and contains:
Introduction to the Book
Foreword – by Nancy White (Full Circle Associates)
Chapter 1. Focusing on User Adoption is Critical
Chapter 4. New Ways of Working

Interview with Cirrus Insight on User Adoption – for Salesforce

I had a discussion recently with Joshua from Cirrus Insight on applying the strategies in my User Adoption Strategies book to Salesforce implementations.

Salesforce adoption is one of the biggest issues facing orgs today. If employees don’t use a piece of software, it doesn’t matter how useful it might be. It’s costing you money.

Read the blog post: on Cirrus Insight
Listen to the discussion: on YouTube

Mini-Workshop at the Office 365 and SharePoint User Group Meeting

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Last week I was the second of two presenters at the Office 365 and SharePoint User Group meeting in Christchurch. My topic was to look at how Office 365 could be used to re-imagine productive work, with the caveat from Lee (the organiser) that the session was to be “highly interactive.” In thinking about how to run the session, I decided to give a very brief introduction to Office 365, argue that it was vital to success to look at how Office 365 can improve various day-to-day working scenarios, and then have the participants do a 5 minute activity in six small groups – and then report back. All in 25 minutes.

I prepared two sets of question sheets – Opportunity Analysis (current state/problem/greatness), Capabilities in Office 365 (what’s on offer), and Behaviours and Culture (essential human behaviours) – and chose two scenarios (holding discussions and managing meetings). In two groups, with three subgroups in each group, I gave one of the six resulting sheets … and asked them to spend 5 minutes answering the questions. Each of the six groups then had 90 seconds each to report back on their analysis / findings.

Here’s what was said:

Holding Discussions

  • Opportunity Analysis … The same discussion happens repeatedly, it’s hard to get everyone on the same page at one time, and discussions are in different places / too many channels, e.g., Yammer, email, physical. There is also no organisation-wide process. It would be great if there was a defined tool and process for all discussions.
  • Capabilities in Office 365 … Yammer, Skype Groups, and SharePoint discussions, with Yammer being the best overall tool in the opinion of the group. Benefits of the different tools included visibility, inclusion (of others), real-time interaction, location independent, and interactive abilities.
  • Behaviours and Culture … Being open minded, willing to learn/adapt, flexibility, anytime/anywhere interaction, willing to be public and share. These were noted as being important because humans are social, we need to evolve, it requires understanding, and we can learn from each other.

Managing Meetings

  • Opportunity Analysis … Meetings happen without an agenda, and no minutes are captured. This means there is no structure to the meeting, people go off on tangents, time is wasted, people come late, and there are no takeaways / actions. It would be great if there was an agenda for every meeting with the invite (and it was early too), and actionable takeaways / decisions were captured.
  • Capabilities in Office 365 … Office 365 offers a whole raft of tools for meetings, including Skype for Business, Planner, Office 365 Groups, OneNote, co-authoring capabilities, SharePoint (for sites, lists, and tasks), Sway (for presenting / communicating differently), Yammer, and Office 365 Video. These tools bring benefits including access to historical information, support for remote meetings, working out loud, collaboration, and transparent action items. The group felt that Skype for Business was the most important tool for meetings.
  • Behaviours and Culture … Key meeting behaviours included focus, the right amount of time, and inclusiveness. The group almost called out the need for agendas for meetings.

Workshop activities like these are good to run in a larger group setting, where the whole group (8-20 people) get the same question in turn. This allows the capturing of more ideas, the ranking of ideas from a larger set, and joint understanding of how to combine new tools with effective behaviours to approach an opportunity. We didn’t do that in this workshop, and instead, given time constraints, I broke the group into small groups. However, it was remarkable how closely aligned the three sub-groups in each scenario were.

My slides are here:

Thanks to everyone who embraced the workshop activity despite the time constraints.

Becoming an Adoption Superhero – My Session at Ignite 2016

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At the time of writing, Microsoft Ignite New Zealand starts in 21 days, 21 hours, 48 minutes, and 55 seconds. This will be the first time I have participated in this conference in New Zealand, and I’ll be there for the opening – and early I hope too.

The session I will be presenting now has a date and time – Wednesday October 26 at 9.00am. Here’s what I’ll be presenting:

Transitioning to Office 365: Becoming the Adoption Superhero for Your Firm
As your firm transitions IT capabilities to Office 365, the new critical skillset is how to translate the opportunities for value presented by Office 365 into new ingrained ways of working for executives, managers, and employees that deliver on that value. Getting to value requires creating the conditions for adoption and driving effective use of new Office 365 capabilities, a skillset and mindset that many IT professionals have not yet focused on developing. But the time for doing so is now upon us: your firm needs an adoption superhero to navigate new territory and safely land the capabilities of Office 365. This session provides aspiring super heroes with a new vocabulary for adoption, a set of strategies for driving effective use, and the mindset required to become the adoption superhero at their firm.

If you’re coming to my session, please add it to your schedule, so as to help the conference organisers allocate the rooms for the anticipated turnout.

That countdown timer is still going. Are you coming?

Driving Effective Use of Office365 – my Workshop at the Digital Workplace Conference 2016

On the day after the Digital Workplace Conference in Auckland a couple of weeks back, as has happened at conferences before, Paul Culmsee and I delivered the post-conference workshops. Paul’s workshop was on becoming the ultimate SharePoint business analyst; mine was on driving the effective use of Office 365.

I had the day with people from five organisations (with all but one not based in Auckland), who wanted to learn a vocabulary for effective use, a framework for approaching the challenge, and various strategies to use (along with examples of when and where those strategies had been used by other organisations). In addition to the framework and strategies I presented, the delegates talked about their approaches, experiences, and learnings to date (which I wrote up during the day and distributed afterwards), and used the materials from the day to consider how to move forward.

It was a good day; I wish the delegates every success moving forward, and will be doing what I can to support their progress.

For more on the workshop, see:
Arrange a Workshop for Your Firm (2 days)
Host a Public Workshop for Clients and Prospects (1 day)
Get the Workbook for the Workshop (286 slides)

Report On Intranet Analytics – Required Reading for Collaboration Teams and Analytics Vendors

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At the end of 2011 I published Collaboration Roadmap, and then faced a decision about what to do regarding User Adoption Strategies. That first printing had sold well, and with only 50 copies left to sell, I could just order another print run or alternatively write a second edition. The second edition option won out for a couple of reasons, with adding a new chapter on measuring and evaluating user adoption (Chapter 11) high on the list of reasons. At the time I was concerned that collaboration service owners, collaboration strategists, intranet managers, and other people focused on delivering great tools and content were too focus on the easy numbers that came out of their analytics tools, and weren’t getting to the heart of what measuring adoption was all about.

In light of my research above and the advice I give in the User Adoption Strategies workshop around measurement and analytics, I was pleased to see the new Intranet Analytics report from ClearBox Consulting in the UK. In describing the purpose of the report, Sam Marshall (Director) says:

We want to move the focus away from reporting about platforms and onto reporting about how an intranet is being used from a business perspective: Who is engaged? What content is working well? Are people creating and collaborating or only consuming?

That intent very much aligns with the type of interest I have in the subject too, and I spent some hours yesterday reading the report and then talking with the report’s author (Dorje McKinnon, Vajra).

A couple of things to note about the report:
– it provides an indepth evaluation of seven major players in the market – HarePoint, CardioLog, NGAGE, Piwik, Webtrends, Adobe Analytics, and Google. The first four vendors provided interviews; the last three did not.
– in order to move away from reiterating a list of features or capability areas, the report runs the products through eleven scenarios, including intranet / enterprise social network / email, site-based activity, content and contributions, and collaboration. Using a scenario-based approach for exploring a topic is one I’m very supportive of.
– Dorje and Sam have provided multiple easy-to-scan tables, summaries, and visual dashboards for comparing and contrasting the tools.

For internal collaboration and intranet teams being asked for analytics information, the report presents the state of play – and will give useful insight into which tools would make most sense given the purposes (scenarios) sought. This is required reading for anyone reporting on or commenting on how their collaboration / social business / intranet / digital workspace is performing.

For the included vendors of analytics tools, the report shines a light on the weaknesses of current analytics products, and will be very useful in planning future capability areas in order to address the real-world scenarios examined in the report. For products not included in the report – such as Kudos Analytics, the brand new Panagenda ConnectionsExpert, and Nintex Hawkeye Workflow Analytics, among many others, the report will give an expert and informed view on what’s needed. This is required reading for every product manager of an analytics tool.

After reading the report yesterday I spoke with Dorje (who is also mentioned in my recent book) about the key message that he wanted people to take from the report. He said:

Thinking about what you need from analytics is the critical place to start. Until you know why you need analytics information – the purposes, the decisions to influence – you won’t get maximum value from analytics information, regardless of the tools you use.

Interestingly, Sam writes the same thing on page 3: The real art to digital workplace analytics is knowing which questions to ask – which requires a clear strategy and a set of goals.

So here’s what I think after reading the report:

  • If you have anything to do with analytics on how your collaboration spaces, social network, intranet or digital workplace is performing, you need to get a copy. It’s available for no charge, although registration is required.
  • As a consequence of this report, Sam and Dorje have established themselves as leading experts on the topic. Once reading the report, you should get their advice in a consulting engagement so as to optimise your internal efforts. Sam is in the UK (giving good coverage of the top half of the world), and Dorje in New Zealand (great access for customers in New Zealand, Australia, and Asia). Internal teams would get a lot of value from securing that consulting support – whether as an outside expert to guide and advise for a few hours a month, or securing Sam or Dorje to facilitate an internal workshop on planning an intranet analytics strategy that makes business sense.

Links:
Get your copy of the report
Contact Sam Marshall
Contact Dorje McKinnon

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On the Increasing Rate of Adoption (Acquisition) of Office 365, and the Challenge of Getting to Effective Use

On LinkedIn last week:

By any current measure that I have seen, the adoption rates of Office 365 are going more than well. The most recent report from a week ago said that “in the last two years, Office 365 has eclipsed all other cloud providers to emerge as the most widely used enterprise cloud service by user count” (per an analysis by Skyhigh Networks). I have been collecting data points like these over the past year and a half for inclusion in my new book on Office 365.

Read more: On the Increasing Rate of Adoption (Acquisition) of Office 365, and the Challenge of Getting to Effective Use