Dr Paul Krivonos on Knowledge Management

Dr. Paul Krivonos from CSUN (scroll down to get to him) teaches and consults on knowledge management.

He’s in New Zealand at the moment, and will be presenting a seminar on April 16 to the Christchurch chapter of the New Zealand Knowledge Management network, entitled Creating a Supportive Communication Culture for Knowledge Sharing.

Information will flow much more freely in an organization where there is a positive communication climate, but may not flow at all, especially when it is most needed, if there is a negative communication climate. A supportive communication climate allows for a better exchange of information and a more positive work environment.

An organization’s climate can be equated to the weather—it is the atmosphere that people feel within the organization itself. It is an integral part of organizational culture. More specifically, communication climate is the atmosphere of supportiveness or defensiveness people feel within the organization and the feelings they have about sending and receiving messages.

To build a supportive communication climate you need to send messages that acknowledge effort, creativity, and teamwork, engage people in the decision making process, establish trust, which is maintained through consistency, congruity, reliability, and integrity.

Yet, it is still not enough to be a nice manager and create a nice environment in which to communicate, exchange information, and work. You must also communicate a sense of challenge to your employees by placing importance on high quality and establishing high performance goals.

Registration required.

0 thoughts on “Dr Paul Krivonos on Knowledge Management

  1. I think you are hitting on something that is a huge issue with many companies, especially companies that are engineering based. The problem is rewarding, or the importance of knowledge. (what isn’t) At technical companies (by technical, I am not referring to IT in this case, but companies like 3M that are very science based) there is countless PhD educated chemists or chemical biologists, or engineers that are compensated by the amount of technical knowhow they posses in terms of patents, etc. Many times, it can be hard to diffuse information because they are not willing to disperse knowledge because it reduces the value of his/her position. This is a real problem because not only does it reduce the importance within the company, but it is a great bargaining chip as a threat to move to another company with that knowledge. Personally, I believe that this is the basis on why some academics can acts like 2 yr olds at times. Self protection.
    In addition, I think that it is human nature to place alot of weight on sunk cost. If I am a chemist who spent 10 years of my life on a new chemical compound or an engineer who developed a new, safer, more effective compounding process, I can understand why some are hesitant to give this information freely.
    We all know the story of Johann Gutenberg, he invented one of the greatest creations of human existence, the printing press, allowing the written word to be spread quickly and cheaply. However, he was fast and loose with his invention, his idea was stolen and he died penniless. Yikes.

  2. Notes on “Establishing a Positive Climate for Knowledge Sharing” (Dr Paul Krivonos)

    Dr Paul Krivinos was in Christchurch earlier this week, and he gave a seminar to the Christchurch chapter of the New Zealand Knowledge Management network on Establishing a Positive Climate for Knowledge Sharing. I didn’t live blog his comments, but

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